Discussion:
Fazioli piano recording
(too old to reply)
Dean Tran
2003-11-16 20:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?

thanks
Chel van Gennip
2003-11-16 21:43:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean Tran
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?
The Chopin Scherzo no.2 on the site of Serg van Gennip is a Fazioli 308.
The audio quality of the recording is not so good (camcorder recording).
The instrument is beatifull. BTW Both the Scherzo video and audio will be
replaced soon as we now have a recording of a better performance of this
piece.
--
Chel van Gennip
Visit Serg van Gennip's site http://www.serg.vangennip.com
Rtotaro
2003-11-17 06:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Artist Chad Hardin has recorded on a Fazioli
Tjako van Schie
2003-11-17 12:03:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean Tran
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?
thanks
I had a recording on the Fazioli grand for dutch radio few years ago.
BEAUTIFUL instrument. I especially liked the 4th pedal which brings the
hammers closer to the strings!

Regards,
Tjako van Schie, pianist
http://www.tjakovanschie.com
H. Emmerson Meyers
2003-11-18 07:22:14 UTC
Permalink
Hey, I think you guys forget the fact that the two greatest pianists of the
20th century played Yamahas:

Glen Gould [2nd Goldberg recording] and Sviatoslov Richter.
Post by Dean Tran
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?
thanks
Thomas F. Unke
2003-11-18 21:06:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by H. Emmerson Meyers
Hey, I think you guys forget the fact that the two greatest pianists of the
Glen Gould [2nd Goldberg recording] and Sviatoslov Richter.
From the beginning I noticed that the 2nd Goldberg had a bad sound. I
thought it was the recording, but as you mention the Yamaha, it makes
more sense ;-)

Anyway, both played the Yamaha CFIIIS, the concert grand, hand crafted
and not to be compared with any other mass production Yamaha grands.
Dean Tran
2003-11-21 17:10:57 UTC
Permalink
I know there are plenty artist recorded their work on Yamaha. MIC
can't really capture the music nuance to distinguish type of
instruments. The more I hear, the more I find out that good painos
sound the same. Yamaha sounds awfully close to some steinway. So, I
take opinions of sound with grain of salt.

Dean
Post by H. Emmerson Meyers
Hey, I think you guys forget the fact that the two greatest pianists of the
Glen Gould [2nd Goldberg recording] and Sviatoslov Richter.
Post by Dean Tran
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?
thanks
Larry
2003-11-21 20:39:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean Tran
I know there are plenty artist recorded their work on Yamaha. MIC
can't really capture the music nuance to distinguish type of
instruments. The more I hear, the more I find out that good painos
sound the same. Yamaha sounds awfully close to some steinway. So, I
take opinions of sound with grain of salt.
Dean
All a piano needs to do to make a good recording is be able to cut through.
Yamahas are bright, percussive, and thin - just what is needed to cut through
any type of ensemble recording work.

Being acoustic however, the test of a piano comes when heard live, right at it
- where all the subtle nuances of the instrument can be heard. This is where
the rubber meets the road in terms of how well a piano can or cannot perform.
Of course, you also have to factor in the listener's tonal preference, and his
or her level of ability to discern the differences.


Larry
Doing the work of 3 men - Larry, Curly, & Moe
Caution: I do not brake for sales weasels
SomeGuyOnTheInternet
2003-11-21 21:49:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
All a piano needs to do to make a good recording is be able to cut through.
Yamahas are bright, percussive, and thin - just what is needed to cut through
any type of ensemble recording work.
Being acoustic however, the test of a piano comes when heard live, right at it
- where all the subtle nuances of the instrument can be heard. This is where
the rubber meets the road in terms of how well a piano can or cannot perform.
Of course, you also have to factor in the listener's tonal preference, and his
or her level of ability to discern the differences.
When making a recording, you want the piano to sound GOOD, whatever that
means to you. Perhaps some people want something that just 'cuts through'.
But others just want a piano that sounds good, period. Yamahas can
certainly deliver that, in my opinion, as a piano player with several
decades of experience. I disagree that they are bright, percussive and
thin. I think they are bright, yes. Thin? no. Percussive, I don't know
what that means, is it something to do with sounding bright?

I just recorded a solo piano jazz record. I had a choice of several
different studios, some with Steinways, some with Yamahas, some with other
brands. I chose a studio that had a 7 foot Yamaha becuase I really like
the sound, and also the touch.

Are you trying to insinuate that I don't have the ability to "discern the
difference"?



*******************************************************************
** The only good velocity-switch is an inaudible velocity-switch **
*******************************************************************
Larry
2003-11-22 01:36:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by SomeGuyOnTheInternet
I disagree that they are bright, percussive and
thin. I think they are bright, yes. Thin? no. Percussive, I don't know
what that means, is it something to do with sounding bright?
There are several things that happen when a hammer hits the strings. There is
the initial impact, which is very percussive on any piano, or the "toneburst".
After that comes sustain and decay. At the very instant after initial contact
with the string, the fullest range of harmonics that will be created are
present, and they immediately begin to die out, usually in a progressive
manner, the shortest, highest frequencies going first. Some pianos will begin
the sustain curve higher up the "spike" of the toneburst, others will produce a
"drop" off the spike, making the toneburst more pronounced. The result - a
percussive sounding piano. Yamahas exhibit this characteristic.
Post by SomeGuyOnTheInternet
Are you trying to insinuate that I don't have the ability to "discern the
difference"?
Not at all. But making a jazz record does not make you an expert on tone. There
are several professional pianists on this board. Your ability to discern
certain aspects of tone are going to constantly improve, as will everyone's as
they gain more and more experience with a broader range of instruments. You are
hearing things from where you are in your experiences, based on the range of
instruments you've been exposed to. Others will arrive at different opinions
than you, based on *their* experiences and range of instruments exposed to.
Just because you don't find a particular piano to have a percussive tendency
does not negate the fact that this percussiveness is well known to exist, and
many others *have* found it so.

Accusing me of insinuating you don't have the ability to discern the difference
bears the implication that you think you have the only opinion that matters,
and that you think because you made a recording gives you some kind of
superiority of opinion. It isn't, it doesn't, and opinions are subjective. If
you don't hear the percussiveness and thinness of a Yamaha, it may be that you
enjoy that kind of sound and you find it pleasing. There's nothing wrong with
that. But don't turn it into some sort of personal affront to your "superior
judgment".



Larry
Doing the work of 3 men - Larry, Curly, & Moe
Caution: I do not brake for sales weasels
SomeGuyOnTheInternet
2003-11-22 20:02:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Not at all. But making a jazz record does not make you an expert on tone.
Of course not, I wasn't trying to imply that. I'm not that
egotistical to think that I know everything, or that my opinion is
more important than anyone else's, and I wasn't trying to present
myself as some kind of expert. Yes, opinions are subjective. You
said something like "all a piano needs to make a good recording is to
be bright, percussive, and thin". I was challenging that statement.
I think it depends on what style of music you're playing. Sometimes
'cutting through' is important. But other times, a beautiful tone is
what is desired. For example, on a solo piano recording. I know that
for me, I wanted a piano with a really nice tone. Also, I disagree
with your characterisation of "thin". I don't find them thin.

Rather, it seemed to me from the tone of your statements, that you
considered yourself some kind of expert on tone, and that you were
insinuating that the only people who like Yamaha pianos are rubes who
don't know any better, and haven't heard any really good pianos. I
was challenging that statement by saying that I've heard some good
pianos, and I still like Yamahas. Of course, I'm not saying that I
have nothing to learn, or that my opinion might not change in the
future.

Perhaps I took your statements the wrong way, if I did, then I
apologize.


*****************************************
*** The only good velocity-switch ***
*** is an inaudible velocity-switch ***
*****************************************
Larry
2003-11-22 22:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by SomeGuyOnTheInternet
Perhaps I took your statements the wrong way, if I did, then I
apologize.
I think we both may have. Please accept my apologies as well.





Larry
Doing the work of 3 men - Larry, Curly, & Moe
Caution: I do not brake for sales weasels
Jens Schlosser
2003-11-22 16:42:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by SomeGuyOnTheInternet
When making a recording, you want the piano to sound GOOD, whatever that
means to you.
There seemed to be sort of a trend that "brilliant" meant "GOOD", I don't
know if it started with the impact of japanese pianos on the "traditional"
markets in Europe and Amerika. When making recordings engineers often ask
for more brilliance, they ask for tuning the upper octaves stretched as far
as possible until they sound out of tune. Sometimes I'm watching live Jazz
in TV and I hear pianos that sound like glass so it almost hurts my ears,
most often Yamahas, but also other brands like Schimmel and even
Boesendorfer.
Post by SomeGuyOnTheInternet
I chose a studio that had a 7 foot Yamaha becuase I really like
the sound, and also the touch
There's nothing wrong with your desicion. The Yamahas I played all had a
very responsive touch but were too brilliant with one exception. I'd expect
a 7 foot recording piano to be in good shape. So maybe your piano was not
too brilliant. But if you ever listened to Glenn Goulds Goldberg Variations,
recorded in 1981 on a Yamaha (I guess the concert grand) you'd hear a good
example of a piano which is too brilliant, from my point of view. I'd bet
that 8 out of 10 people would agree that this particular Yamaha sounds
terribly bright. It is one of the few recordings that I can't listen to
without using the EQ of my Amplifier (which is usually bypassed).

Best regards,
Jens


PS: May I suggest you use your real name when taking part in usenet?
Thomas F. Unke
2003-11-22 18:52:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jens Schlosser
too brilliant. But if you ever listened to Glenn Goulds Goldberg Variations,
recorded in 1981 on a Yamaha (I guess the concert grand) you'd hear a good
example of a piano which is too brilliant, from my point of view.
Yep. Until recently I didn't know it was a Yamaha. For many years I
wondered why in 1981 they still make such a technically bad
recording. The sound is not just too brilliant, it is ugly.
Jens Schlosser
2003-11-22 19:46:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas F. Unke
Yep. Until recently I didn't know it was a Yamaha. For many years I
wondered why in 1981 they still make such a technically bad
recording. The sound is not just too brilliant, it is ugly.
Thomas,

interesting enough, Glenn Gould seemed to have been very happy to have found
this piano, since his own Steinway was not available anymore because he
didn't like the touch anymore after it was rebuild. You can read about it in
the book by Franz Mohr (the famous Steinway technician). I really wonder if
Glenn Gould only took this Yamaha because he liked the touch and didn't care
for the sound that much or if he got the sound adjusted according to his
wishes, too. Some of the older Gould recordings are done on a beautifully
voiced Steinway (except for his experiments with the "harpsi-piano" and the
older recordings suffering from technical limitations of the time) so why
did he change to such a piano?

Best regards,
Jens
Doogle333
2003-11-23 05:19:23 UTC
Permalink
I love the tone of the Yamaha piano Gould used in his 2nd recording of the
Goldberg Variations. I think it is absolutely beautiful.

It seems obvious that whether one likes it or not is a matter of subjective
personal preference based somewhat on cultural conditioning.

It is human nature to believe that one's own esthetic sensibilities are
superior to others, but sometimes they are merely biased.

Doogle.
SomeGuyOnTheInternet
2003-11-22 20:02:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jens Schlosser
Sometimes I'm watching live Jazz
in TV and I hear pianos that sound like glass so it almost hurts my ears,
most often Yamahas, but also other brands like Schimmel and even
Boesendorfer.
Maybe jazz players have tendency to prefer brighter pianos than
classical players. My tastes have probably been shaped by listening
to jazz piano recordings more than classical piano recordings, which I
almost never listen to anymore.
Post by Jens Schlosser
PS: May I suggest you use your real name when taking part in usenet?
I used to do that. But having been scarred by the stress of being
involved in various flame wars, I now prefer anonymity. I still try
to be polite, but I feel more free to speak my mind this way.



*****************************************
*** The only good velocity-switch ***
*** is an inaudible velocity-switch ***
*****************************************
Thomas F. Unke
2003-11-21 22:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
All a piano needs to do to make a good recording is be able to cut
through. Yamahas are bright, percussive, and thin - just what is
needed to cut through any type of ensemble recording work.
Actually, you don't need a good recording to notice the quality of a
piano. For example the old recordings from 1930 ff, technically really
poor, but still the sound of those old Steinways or Bechsteins is
impressive. I just listened today to the magic of a Dino Lipatti
recording.

Not to be compared with a Yamaha ;-)

(I think I agree very much with your opinion on Yamahas, having owned
a C6 for several years)
H. Emmerson Meyers
2003-12-09 05:22:58 UTC
Permalink
Personally, my favorite piano is a well voiced M&H concert grand!!
Post by Thomas F. Unke
Post by Larry
All a piano needs to do to make a good recording is be able to cut
through. Yamahas are bright, percussive, and thin - just what is
needed to cut through any type of ensemble recording work.
Actually, you don't need a good recording to notice the quality of a
piano. For example the old recordings from 1930 ff, technically really
poor, but still the sound of those old Steinways or Bechsteins is
impressive. I just listened today to the magic of a Dino Lipatti
recording.
Not to be compared with a Yamaha ;-)
(I think I agree very much with your opinion on Yamahas, having owned
a C6 for several years)
Q***@hotmail.com
2003-12-09 04:39:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by H. Emmerson Meyers
Personally, my favorite piano is a well voiced M&H concert grand!!
OH MY GOD!!!!!

H.E.M?!?!?

I don't believe it's actually you!!!!!!!
Why can't the other three trillion members of the human race finally
understand that M&H is where it's at?!?!??!

How come only you and that other guy know that Maon & H. is the best
piano? Conspiracy? It's so unfair!

Robert Schuh
2003-11-27 22:52:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by H. Emmerson Meyers
Hey, I think you guys forget the fact that the two greatest pianists of the
Glen Gould [2nd Goldberg recording] and Sviatoslov Richter.
Post by Dean Tran
Any pianists who recorded their piano works with Fazioli piano?
thanks
I was just involved with a recording session last week with a 9'2" Fazioli in
Burbank. I am the drummer with the Bob Ravenscroft Jazz trio. I have to admit
that this piano was THE most amazing instrument that I have ever heard in my
now 33 years of playing music. Bob brought in a piano Specialist by the name of
Michael Spreeman to to all the tech work on the piano, but the clarity of that
instrument to the entire range was incredible. I have been in a few recording
sessions with Bosendorfers, that they did not seem to have half the presence of
the Fazioli. This particular instrument was used by Herbie Hancock the week
before and it had the magnetic action. If you can afford it and want THE most
amazing piano going, you can't go wrong.


--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche
"The meek shall inherit nothing" - Zappa
don adams
2003-11-28 01:12:03 UTC
Permalink
X-No-Archive: Yes
In article <***@robschuh.com>,
Robert Schuh <***@robschuh.com> wrote:

Dear group....please, PLEASE ignore anything and everthing Robert Schuh
says. He is a dishosest hoser living in Pheonix, AZ and he terrorizes
several other music newsgroups. He is a cheat and a talentless wanna-be.
Do a Google groups search on his name for a view of his antics. He is
widely despised.
I highly recommend killfiling him with all haste....don't let the benign
nature of this post fool you....you're just playing into his trap.
He's a loser.
Post by Robert Schuh
I was just involved with a recording session last week with a 9'2" Fazioli in
Burbank. I am the drummer with the Bob Ravenscroft Jazz trio. I have to admit
that this piano was THE most amazing instrument that I have ever heard in my
now 33 years of playing music. Bob brought in a piano Specialist by the name of
Michael Spreeman to to all the tech work on the piano, but the clarity of that
instrument to the entire range was incredible. I have been in a few recording
sessions with Bosendorfers, that they did not seem to have half the presence of
the Fazioli. This particular instrument was used by Herbie Hancock the week
before and it had the magnetic action. If you can afford it and want THE most
amazing piano going, you can't go wrong.
--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche
"The meek shall inherit nothing" - Zappa
Robert Schuh
2003-11-29 04:08:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by don adams
X-No-Archive: Yes
Dear group....please, PLEASE ignore anything and everthing Robert Schuh
says. He is a dishosest hoser living in Pheonix, AZ and he terrorizes
several other music newsgroups. He is a cheat and a talentless wanna-be.
Do a Google groups search on his name for a view of his antics. He is
widely despised.
I highly recommend killfiling him with all haste....don't let the benign
nature of this post fool you....you're just playing into his trap.
He's a loser.
Skip,
Get a life. Why not grow up and post your real name when you write this sophomoric
swill??



--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche
"The meek shall inherit nothing" - Zappa
Q***@hotmail.com
2003-12-09 04:36:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Schuh
I am the drummer with the Bob Ravenscroft Jazz trio
No way. Not *THE* Bob Ravenschmidt Jazz Quartet?
Are you serious? Wow. You are truly incredulous.

And, as a drummer, what, again, is your opinion of the various
piano-related matters?

Man...this is cool. Only five more degrees to Kevin Bacon.
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